Micro-Teaching I — Lesson Plan

Class Description: The class consists of 15 adult learners ranging in age between 21 and 50. There are six men and nine women. Their previous educational background ranges from third grade to university degree in their native countries. They are all from Mexico and Central and South America, with an L1 of Spanish. These are the remaining students out of 20 who started the class in August. Two were also in my class last spring.

This is a literacy/low beginning level class; all students tested at level 0 or 1 on the Best Plus. Some want to advance to GED and college classes; others just want to communicate effectively in English in the workplace and in community interactions. The class meets from 6:00pm to 9:00pm three evenings a week at Southwest Key, a charter school for sixth graders, near the former Johnston High School campus in East Austin. The students are highly motivated as judged by willingness to do homework and participate in class activities. Most of them have excellent attendance, even though many of them have to drive from Northwest Austin. We meet in the sixth-grade language arts classroom, which has a projector to which I can connect my computer. The classroom has five small square tables and one larger round table for student seating. Before class, I combine four of the small tables to form two longer rectangular tables, providing for three groups of students. We also have access to a computer lab, which we use for 1.5 hours a week. This class is a part of Austin Community College’s Adult Basic Education program. There are no grades; performance is measured by progress as indicated by assessment with the Best Plus test.

Timetable Fit: This lesson is from Level 1, Unit 3, in Cambridge’s Ventures series. It is at the beginning of a unit on Friends and Family. The previous class was a review of the first two units: Personal Information and At School. Homework will be to bring a family photograph or a picture of a family from a magazine. The next class will begin with a dialog line discussion of the family photographs, followed by practice using the present continuous and asking Wh- questions.

Learning Outcomes: Learners will be able to: (1) identify the following family members in drawings and photographs: brother, daughter, father, grandfather, grandmother, husband, mother, sister, son; (2) identify targeted vocabulary in a listening task; (3) use targeted vocabulary in sentences.

Activities, procedures, and timing:

Activity/ Aids

Interaction

Procedure

Time

Photograph of nuclear family

Whole-class discussion

Prompt for nuclear family vocabulary represented in photograph.

5 min

Student book, p 32; also project on marker board if possible

Partner discussion

Ask partners (or triads) to work together to name as many family members as they can in the pictures. Label pictures on marker board.

5 min

(1) Student book, p 33; also project on marker board if possible  (2) student CD track 15

Individual listening followed by whole-class discussion

Explain Activity A. Play the first conversation and pause to verify that everyone understands what to do. Play the remaining conversations. Repeat if necessary, pausing after each conversation to check for comprehension. Student volunteers circle the words on the board.

10 min

(1) Student book, p 33; also project on marker board if possible  (2) student CD track 15

Individual listening followed by whole-class discussion

Explain Activity B. Play the first conversation and pause to verify that everyone understands what to do. Play the remaining conversations. Repeat if necessary, pausing after each conversation to check for comprehension. Student volunteers write their answers on the board.

10 min

Cards for matching game (1 set for every 2 students)

Partners

Explain game; monitor activity

10 min

One set of cards for matching game

Whole class

Put one set of cards from the matching game in a box top for students to draw from. Students are to draw a card and make up a sentence using the word they draw.

10 min

Problems and Possibilities: (1) It may not be possible to project onto a marker board. In that case, simply list the vocabulary on the marker board or chalkboard and write answers independently of the projected text.  (2) If there is not enough time to finish the activities, they can be continued at the beginning of the next class period. (3) If the class finishes early, have the students work in groups of three or four to talk about members of their immediate families.